All Posts By

procatchmaster

How Far Mosquitoes Fly: Implications for Control

By | Mosquitoes | No Comments

How Far Mosquitoes Fly

One of the factors that makes mosquitoes difficult to control is that they fly.  Therefore, even if a yard has been properly serviced, flying, biting mosquitoes may appear, much to a customer’s chagrin!  Let’s look at two scenarios to see how flight range and other factors may impact a mosquito control service.

Mosquito Scenario A

Location:  backyard in urban Louisiana.

Mosquito:  Asian tiger mosquito (ATM), Aedes albopictus.

Flight range:  Limited – 150 yards or less from breeding site.

Breeding sites:  Artificial and natural containers holding relatively clean water.

Control

The key here is source reduction = finding and removing or treating all breeding sites.  The female ATM lays eggs in as many places as she can find so you have to really inspect thoroughly.  Because of the limited flight range, adults are much less likely to re-infest the property.  Use non-pesticidal traps and residual sprays or mosquito bait on vegetation.

Mosquito Scenario B

Location:  coastal areas along saltmarshes in Texas.

Mosquito:  Black saltmarsh mosquito, Aedes taeniorhynchus.

Flight range:  40 miles or so from breeding site!

Breeding sites:  Salt marshes.

Control

Wow!  Mosquitoes that fly 40 miles!  Obviously, larval control will not be part of your service!  These mosquitoes are vicious biters, attacking during the day.  Use residual sprays or baits on vegetation along with ultra-low-volume spray, and good luck!

Learn more about Captain Stan (aka the Mosquito Man) here: https://catchmaster.com/introducing-captain-stan-the-mosquito-man/

Learn more about mosquitoes from the NPMA here: https://www.pestworld.org/pest-guide/mosquitoes/

5 Tips for a Naturally Pest-Free Garden

By | Tips & Inspirations | No Comments

Controlling pests in a garden is no easy task but there are 5 tips for a naturally pest-free garden that will help. Pests are naturally drawn to landscaping as plants offer pests food, moisture and shelter.  All of these elements are necessary for their survival. Naturally controlling the bad pests in a garden can help ensure plantings will flourish.  In addition, a home with a well-maintained landscape adds enjoyment and increases a home’s value.  But the benefits don’t end there.

Naturally controlling bad pests in the garden will help to ensure a pest-free home. Overgrown shrubs, trees and plantings, leaf debris and unsightly weeds will attract pests to the exterior of your home. Eventually, those garden pests near the perimeter of your home may make their way inside in search of food, water and shelter.

Follow these tips for a naturally pest-free garden and enjoy the added benefit of protecting your home pest invaders.

5 tips for a Naturally Pest-Free Garden

  1. Use physical barriers, such as a copper tape, that will act as a repellent to deter pests like snails and slugs. As the copper develops the green patina the compounds become toxic to pests.  Many gardeners have found this will help to deter snails and slugs from crossing it.
  2. Overgrown trees and shrubs can be a perfect spot for pests to nest in. Keep plants and shrubs well-trimmed, away from the home, as overgrown branches also offer pests the perfect highway into the home as they seek out food and water.
  3. Rake-up leaf litter and plant debris that serves as the perfect hiding spot for ticks and other pests and an excellent breeding ground for mosquitoes.
  4. Remove anything that may collect water and drain decorative items weekly.  Objects like birdbaths and plant dishes may offer mosquitoes a place to breed.
  5. Stay ahead of the pests – ask your pest management professional about monitoring with Catchmaster® AG sticky cards.

Additional Resources

Learn more about Catchmaster® AG sticky cards here: https://catchmasterpro.com/product/sticky-cards/

Learn more garden tips from the National Gardening Association here: https://garden.org/

Tips for Fruit Flies – Big Ed’s Trapping Tips

By | Trapping Tips | No Comments

Tips for catching fruit flies

With the summer months upon us so is the reminder that a pest loves fresh produce almost as much as us.  Fruit flies are a significant nuisance pest and have a powerful sense of smell.  The spend their whole life in search of rotting fruit and once they find a source they can quickly become an issue.  With many fruit fly traps available in the professional market here are some tips for making your traps more effective.

3 Tips for Catching More Fruit Flies

  1. Use a glue board under your fruit fly traps.  Fruit flies tend not to land directly on their intended food source but often land close by and walk around to investigate, providing an opportunity to increase your catch.
  2. Place your fruit fly trap in the middle of an exposed glue board – this will allow you to pick up as many flies as possible as they seek their food source.  This will dramatically increase your catch.
  3. Locate and remove the food source as soon as possible to get control over these nuisance flies.  Remember that food sources can come from many places including drains, appliances and garbage.  A thorough cleaning may be required to remove all food sources.

Catchmaster® insect boards and monitors are ideal glue boards to utilize, learn more here: https://catchmasterpro.com/product/insect-traps-monitors/

Learn more about Big Ed here: https://catchmaster.com/introducing-big-ed-and-his-trapping-tips/

Learn more about fruit flies from the NPMA here: https://www.pestworld.org/pest-guide/flies/fruit-flies/

 

On The Wing – Return Of The Mosquitoes

By | Mosquitoes | 2 Comments

Spring Mosquito Season

Mosquito season is in full swing in many parts of the country.  I was just in Louisiana last week and companies there are already out providing mosquito control services.  Do you ever wonder where mosquitoes ‘return from’ each season?  Some species spend the winter (or cooler months) as adults.  They hang out in buildings, animal burrows, under decks or other protected areas.  Then, when one of the first warm days of spring arrives (usually above 65 degrees or so), they emerge and look for something, or someone, to bite!

Other species overwinter in the egg stage.  These eggs hatch almost simultaneously with the spring rains and then 10 days later or so, huge clouds of hungry adult mosquitoes emerge.  This particular scenario is especially common in heavily wooded areas, swamps, forest preserves, etc.  Mosquito control personnel try to limit this emergence by applying mosquito larvicides, often by fixed wing or rotary aircraft, in the early spring before the adults are produced.

And remember that after each blood meal, a female mosquito can lay 150-300 eggs so the populations will build up quickly, regardless of how harsh the winter may have been.

Learn more about Captain Stan (aka the Mosquito Man) here: https://catchmaster.com/introducing-captain-stan-the-mosquito-man/

Top 7 Tips for Mosquito Inspections

By | Mosquitoes | No Comments

7 Tips for Mosquito Inspections

A thorough inspection is key to solving any pest problem, and this is especially true when it comes to mosquitoes. With all due respect to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, are you a ‘sure lock’ at investigating mosquito problems and providing reliable solutions to your customers? Read on for some valuable information and tips for battling these thirsty bloodsuckers.

  1. NECESSARY TOOLS. All mosquitoes require water to complete their life cycle so most of your inspection will involve looking for and sampling water sources. At a minimum, have a mosquito dipper (available from most biological supply companies); a plastic turkey baster for getting into small areas; plastic, resealable bags for samples; a small metal or plastic pan for examining samples; and a good flashlight. The tools will not take up much room on your truck and they are very inexpensive.
  2. INTERVIEW THE CUSTOMER. On your initial visit, interview the customer if possible. Ask about standing water sources on the property. Are people bitten mostly during the day, in the evening or both? Are there certain areas of the yard where mosquito biting is more intense? Do they get bitten inside the house? Do they have an irrigation/sprinkler system? This interview will provide valuable information to help guide your inspection and subsequent treatments. Also, look around the yard for evidence of mosquito repellents, candles, torches and other things a customer may be using to ward off mosquitoes.
  3. ELIMINATE TOP BREEDING SITES. Mosquitoes will breed in almost anything that can hold water, from a large, neglected swimming pool to something as small as a bottle cap, so take your time and examine the premises thoroughly. A partial list of common mosquito breeding sites includes tires, outdoor sinks, buckets, pet dishes, bird baths, bottles and cans, children’s toys, flower pots and drain saucers, tarps, leaky faucets, wheelbarrows, low spots holding water, decorative fountains that aren’t maintained and kiddie pools.Not all mosquito breeding sites are obvious. Be sure to look for water-holding plants such as bromeliads. Although these may only hold a small amount of water, they can produce enormous numbers of mosquitoes! Open and examine any in-ground drains for sprinkler and irrigation systems. Check corrugated plastic tubes used to draw water away from downspouts — frequently the ends of these tip up or curl and hold water. And don’t forget to look up during your inspection! Clogged gutters and tree holes are often the culprits. Also, while you are inspecting the premises, take note of any mosquitoes that may be attempting to bite you!
  4. TAKE SAMPLES. Sometimes, mosquito larvae and pupae (the immature stages) can be easily seen where they are breeding, such as in a bucket or plastic bottle. Other times they may not be so obvious. For larger bodies of water, use the plastic dipper for sampling, focusing on the surface of the water. For smaller spaces such as tree holes or plants, use the turkey baster to suck the water out. Dump the water into your plastic or metal pan (a light background works best) and look for the wigglers and tumblers. Tapping the side of the pan with your baster or finger will cause the mosquitoes to move around, making them easier to see. If you choose to preserve any samples, simply dump the water and mosquitoes into one of the resealable bags.Be advised that mosquito larvae and pupae are very sensitive to shadows and vibrations. If you cast a shadow over the breeding site or disturb it prior to sampling, the mosquitoes will dive below the surface of the water, where they can remain for a minute or so. Therefore, you may have to wait a short time before taking your sample.
  5. SHOW THE CUSTOMER. One of the most effective tools in your arsenal can be to show the customer the mosquitoes that you found as well as the breeding sites. Explain why the site is producing mosquitoes, what the different mosquito life stages are, and what, if anything, the customer can do about it. If you plan to treat any sites with larvicide or an insect growth regulator (IGR), explain that as well. Frequently, the customer may say something like ‘so, THAT’S what they look like. I always wondered what those were’ and they may then lead you to other breeding sites on the property that you didn’t find.
  6. DON’T FORGET EXCLUSION. Examine the structure(s) for mosquito entry points, especially if people are being bitten indoors. Look for torn or missing screens, broken windows, and doors that may be left open, propped open or don’t fit tightly. Mosquitoes will find their way inside buildings through the smallest of spaces! Also, some kinds of mosquitoes are highly attracted to light, so a change in lighting scheme may help.
  7. INSPECT ON EVERY VISIT. Under ideal conditions, mosquitoes can complete their life cycle in as little as 5-7 days. Therefore, if you only visit the property every 30 days or so, you may encounter several new or previously undetected breeding sites and there may be adult mosquitoes on the loose. Hopefully, if you have properly educated your customer, some of these sites will be emptied before you arrive. Regardless, take the time on every visit to do another thorough inspection of the property.

IN SUMMARY: Top 7 Tips for Mosquito Inspections 

Now that you have successfully found the breeding sites on your customer’s property, you can make decisions on which sources to dump or drain and which ones may need to be treated. However, do not dump or drain any water without first asking the customer, and always read and follow the label on any product you choose to use. It can also be useful to make a quick map of the property, showing where the breeding sites and any conducive conditions were for future reference.

What if you can’t find any mosquito breeding on the customer’s property, yet they are still having a mosquito problem? This is common due to the fact that some kinds of mosquitoes will fly significant distances, up to perhaps 40 miles, from their breeding sites before they feed. So, you may not be able to do anything about the breeding sites but you can offer a service to control the adult mosquitoes. And, it is always a good idea to explain situations like this to the customer.

Finally, remember that without a thorough inspection for mosquito breeding sites on each visit, your mosquito control service is likely to fail, resulting in callbacks, unhappy customers and cancellations. So, look hard and look often!

Now that you know the top 7 tips for mosquito inspections, learn more about Captain Stan (aka the Mosquito Man) here: https://catchmaster.com/introducing-captain-stan-the-mosquito-man/

AP&G Co., Inc. Announces the Promotion of Ed Dolshun to Vice President of Business Development

By | Uncategorized | No Comments

For Immediate Release

January 17, 2016 (Brooklyn, NY) – AP&G Co., Inc. recently announced the expansion of their leadership team with the promotion of Ed Dolshun to the position of Vice President of Business Development. “Our commitment to growth and dedication to developing innovative products for the pest management industry led to the need for this additional role,” says Jonathan Frisch, VP of Global Sales and Marketing.

In addition to his current duties as Technical Director for the company, Dolshun will now focus on expanding the company’s product line. In his new position, he will research new markets, manage the development of new products and provide product validation for AP&G’s growing family of products. Finally, Dolshun will work with AP&G’s Marketing Department to cultivate new messages and serve as a technical/educational resource to the Sales Team.

Dolshun says he is, “Looking forward to learning even more about pests and pest issues around the world and how AP&G can help to address those issues.”

Dolshun has ten years of pest management industry experience. Prior to joining AP&G Co., Inc. he served many years as Environmental and Regulatory Specialist at Bergen County Community Development and also taught an Environmental Issues course at Fairleigh Dickinson University as part of their Masters of Administrative Science Program.

Ed can be reached at:
Email: edolshun@catchmaster.com
Ph: 347-525-8493

Ed Dolshun

Vice President of Business Development