Category

Insects

Catchmaster Pestimonial – Diox Pest Control

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In this Catchmaster Pestimonial we examine how our Ovi-Catch™ Mosquito Trap helped Mike Robertson from Diox Pest Control with sensitive accounts.

Ovi-Catch Helped Save This Pest Professional’s Two Largest Accounts

Mike Robertson is owner and CEO of Diox Pest Control. Prior to owning his own firm, Mike spent 17 years in the pest management industry working different aspects of the business from pest management technician to quality assurance manager in California, Washington and Hawaii. Mike recently shared with us his current struggle with controlling mosquitoes in two large resort accounts with sensitive water areas that contained wildlife, prohibiting his ability to use chemicals for control.

“Mosquitoes are a great add-on service offering for pest professionals. They are typically not a part of a general pest control contract and therefore an important and profitable addition for a pest management firm. Two of my current accounts are high-end resorts. Although they were happy with our general pest control, we struggled to get a true reduction in mosquitoes. These clients are located very close to areas where mosquitoes are reported as being infected with Zika & West Nile Virus so it’s beyond being a nuisance, mosquito control here is also about public health protection.”

Catchmater Pestimonial: Ovi-Catch Mosquito Trap

“When I learned about Ovi-Catch I liked the concept and and decided to give them a try. After having Ovi-Catch out for two months, the clients are extremely happy with the control we’ve gained over mosquitoes. In just two months, they’ve hardly noticed mosquitoes in otherwise problem areas. I immediately decided to put out more throughout the rest of the property.”

Mike was thrilled with the results, “I’ve caught too many mosquitoes to count.” He went on to explain that his finding is the closer to the proximity of the standing water that you place the unit the higher the number of mosquitoes you’ll see on the glue board. Mike also began placing the units near areas where high mosquito populations were typically reported, usually within 20 feet of a breeding source to get the most control.

We asked Mike how the units fit into the resort surroundings and he shared: “Besides being very effective, I really like that the buckets blend into the landscape. It’s a different approach to mosquito control. I can see a lot of opportunity with Ovi-Catch in the future and I’m planning to expand this to new properties as an alternative means of mosquito control. Ovi-Catch saved two of my largest accounts, totaling $50-$60k per year. I’m very happy I found this product.”

Additional Resources

Learn more about Ovi-Catch™ Mosquito Trap here: https://catchmasterpro.com/product/ovi-catch-ago-mosquito-trap/

Bobby Kossowicz is a content creator for the Catchmaster® brand, learn more here: https://catchmasterpro.com/blog/bobby-kossowicz/

Mosquito Season 2019 – September Update

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In this mosquito season 2019 update, our Captain Stan (aka the Mosquito Man) shares some updates with fall approaching.  Although the season is changing, that doesn’t mean mosquitoes aren’t still a threat.

Is Mosquito Season Winding Down? Don’t be Fooled


The end of summer generally means cooler temperatures, and cooler temperatures mean fewer mosquitos, right?  Well, maybe.  There may be fewer mosquitoes but the disease threat, particularly in 2019, is still significant and all precautions to avoid mosquito bites should be practiced until the first hard freeze in your region.

Examples, you say?  Eastern equine encephalomyelitis, or EEE, has already killed four people in Massachusetts and it has been found in mosquitoes over a wide area of the state (also in some neighboring states).  There have also been several fatal cases in horses in Michigan.  West Nile virus has been very active throughout the country this year and in warmer areas, transmission to humans could continue into October or even November.  Finally, the yellow fever mosquito (Aedes aegypti, responsible for spreading Zika virus, chikungunya, yellow fever and dengue) continues to spread throughout California.

Mosquitoes bite; they want your blood,
And they care not that they aren’t loved;
They’re nature’s scourge, so stay awake;
Protect yourself – make no mistake.

(Ok, I know that I lack an impressive iambic pentameter……)

When not dabbling in poetry, our Captain Stan (aka the Mosquito Man) is our Vice President of Technical Services.  Learn more about Stan here:  https://catchmaster.com/introducing-captain-stan-the-mosquito-man/

Additional Resources

For help with mosquito season 2019 & beyond, discover Catchmaster® mosquito management tools:  https://catchmasterpro.com/product/final-feed-mosquito-bait/

Finally, learn more about mosquitoes from the NPMA here: https://www.pestworld.org/pest-guide/mosquitoes/

How to Spot a Spotted Lanternfly Infestation

By | blog, Insects, spotted lanternfly, Tips & Inspirations, Trapping Tips | No Comments

If you are unfamiliar with the spotted lanternfly, Lycorma delicatula (White) (Hemiptera: Fulgoridae), it’s a good idea to get acquainted with this sap-feeding insect before it’s too late.  Your trees and produce may already be at risk.

Spotted lanternfly background

First spotted in the United States in 2014, the invasive pest was originally discovered in Pennsylvania and has since spread rapidly.  It is known to feed on vines, shrubs, fruit trees, hardwoods, grapevines, and over 70 other species of trees. Infestations are often accidental but can occur seemingly overnight when eggs are transported by landscapers or homeowners doing yardwork. Egg masses and other life stages can also be found on a variety of other outdoor items including vehicles, patio furniture, swing sets, and more. For that reason, it’s very easy for them to spread quickly when humans move anything bearing the eggs.

So, how do you spot an infestation of the spotted lanternfly? The following can help as you check for egg masses on trees and items stored outside.

Identification & Life Cycle

If you hear of an infestation in your area, it’s a good idea to look for eggs all over your property.  They can be anywhere – not just on trees. The spotted lanternfly has one generation every year. Adult females lay eggs in September and continue until early December. Early detection is key as the eggs can survive the winter months and hatch in early spring.

Resembling mud, the pod-like egg masses are usually gray or off-white and will crack and darken over time.

The eggs hatch in the spring and the nymphs immediately begin feeding. They are recognized as small black nymphs with white spots.

The spotted lanternfly completes four life stages, also known as instars, before maturing into adults. The first three instar nymphs are black with white markings while the fourth instar nymphs are reddish-orange with white markings.

Mostly seen in late summer and fall, adult nymphs have wings and are about an inch long and a half inch wide. They have gray forewings with black spots and hindwings that can be red, white and black striped.

Tree-Banding for the spotted lanternfly

If you are concerned about populations of the spotted lanternfly in your area, consider working with a pest professional who can perform tree-banding. Tree-banding creates a physical barrier on tree trunks that consist of a wrap and glue. The process allows homeowners to monitor trees proactively for the spotted lanternfly. Click here to learn more.

Additional Resources

Learn more from Penn State University here: https://extension.psu.edu/spotted-lanternfly-management-for-homeowners

Learn more about tree-banding with our Catchmaster® TB-1 glue here: https://catchmasterpro.com/product/tree-banding-glue/

Bobby Kossowicz is a content creator for the Catchmaster® brand, learn more here: https://catchmasterpro.com/blog/bobby-kossowicz/