Category

Mosquitoes

Mosquito Battles – Final Feed Mosquito Bait

By | Mosquitoes, Pest Business, Pestimonials, Tips & Inspirations, Trapping Tips | No Comments

Saving the Schools

In this version of Pest Management Professional’s Mosquito Battles series, Anaheim Union High School District’s Rich Kravetz controls the growing mosquito population in Southern California with Final Feed Mosquito Bait.

Anaheim, California was hit by more than just a heat wave in the spring of 2019. A new species of mosquito was flying about the city, darkening the normally sunny skies.  This mosquito – known as the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) was targeting high population areas with tall trees and thick bushes, such as the Anaheim Union High School District.

Mosquito Battles - Kravetz

Rich Kravetz, an integrated pest management (IPM) technician for the school district, knows the importance of protecting schools from Asian tiger mosquitoes, a known carrier of West Nile virus and other illnesses. Kravetz is no newbie to the pest management profession – hit father has owned a pest control business for the last 50 years. Because of his background, Kravetz understands how much of an impact one product can have on the mosquito population.

Kravetz began using Catchmasters’ Final Feed Mosquito Bait in 2019, and has seen a huge impact across all 22 locations of the Anaheim Union High School District.

“We had a cloud of mosquitoes over Orange County and Southern California, so we were just looking for something to help alleviate or lessen the frustration with them,” says Kravetz, “We started using it in May, and we are already seeing huge results.”

Mosquito Battles - Final Feed

Kravetz has tried multiple different tactics to try to lessen the severity of the Asian tiger mosquito population around the schools, but has found that not much works to effectively rid the area of the pest – except for Final Feed.

“The product goes right on the shady bushes where the mosquitoes hang out, so the sweet draws them in and the garlic kills them,” he explains.

The non-toxic formula used in Final Feed makes it ideal to use around children, utilizing natural fruit juices to bait the mosquitoes and garlic to starve them. When paired with Catchmaster’s Ovi-Catch Mosquito Trap, Kravetz says, the combination makes for the ideal mosquito solution for schoolyards.

Mosquito Battles - Ovi-Catch

Showing results with the product is also easy, according to Kravetz. Every female mosquito killed by Final Feed or caught by Ovi-Catch mosquito trap eliminates up to 1,000 future mosquitoes. The best part of using Final Feed around the schools for Kravetz is being able to communicate with the students, staff and parents that the IPM technicians are doing something that will have results. Kravetz recalls it having the most impact on a special needs school in the district.

Kravetz sprayed the property with Final Feed, and saw positive results almost immediately. Final Feed helps to control the mosquitoes, resulting in smaller populations. This allowed the children to spend more time outside with less of a risk to get bites from the daytime-feeding species.

Mosquito Battles - Garlic

“Anything I can do for them means a lot,” Kravetz says, “They’re so appreciative. When you get a smile from the kids playing outside – that’s real.”

A little goes a long way with Final Feed, so Kravetz is able to spray more sparingly and still impact the mosquito population at the school.

“I can’t recommend this enough,” Kravetz says of Ovi-Catch, “The buckets are out of sight from the kids and families.” Meanwhile, of Final Feed he says, “The smell is nice. It’s really a great product to have.”

Mosquito Battles – Additional Resources

Get more content like this daily when you follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/catchmasterPRO/

Get our Mosquito Management Guide here: https://catchmasterpro.com/mosquito-management-program/

For help with mosquito season 2020 & beyond, discover Catchmaster® mosquito management tools:  https://catchmasterpro.com/collection/mosquito-management-tools/

In addition, learn more about mosquitoes from the NPMA here: https://www.pestworld.org/pest-guide/mosquitoes/

Finally, get tips for your business by following us on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/ap&g-co-inc

Mosquito Control Inspections – Top Overlooked Breeding Sites

By | Mosquitoes, Pest Business, Tips & Inspirations | No Comments

When it comes to mosquito control inspections are important. The key to a successful mosquito service is a thorough inspection, done on each visit to the customer’s property.  If all mosquito breeding sites are not identified and either eliminated or treated, your customers will not be happy and you will waste time and money on callbacks.

Mosquito Control Inspections - Top Breeding Sites

The ‘usual suspects’ for mosquito breeding include bird baths, buckets, kiddie pools, kids’ toys, discarded trash, used tires, etc.; basically, anything that will hold water from bottle caps to an abandoned swimming pool.  However, some breeding sites may be ‘cryptic’, that is, hidden or not very obvious.  Let’s take a look at some of them:

Mosquito Control Inspections – Top 9 Overlooked Spots

  1. Water-holding plants, such as bromeliads – it is not likely these can or will be removed but they can be treated with a larvicide.
  2. In-ground drains – ask if the customer has an irrigation system that utilizes in-ground drains. These often hold water and a high content of organic matter, perfect for foul water-loving mosquitoes such as the Northern and Southern house mosquitoes. 
  3. Corrugated plastic tubes – these are often attached to downspouts to pull water away from structures. The ends usually curl up and hold just enough water to cause trouble!
  4. Large piles of leaves – adult mosquitoes will rest in damp piles of leaves, and some leaves are large enough to hold water.
  5. Clogged gutters – some folks have full-blown botanical gardens growing in their gutters!
  6. Treeholes – remember to look up! A large treehole can hold lots of water, and many species of mosquitoes will breed here.
  7. Abandoned rodent bait boxes – these can hold water and are like the Ritz-Carlton to mosquitoes!
  8. Drainage saucers under potted plants – recommend that your customers set their pots on bamboo sticks or rocks to increase the drainage. Drainage saucers are breeding heaven, especially for the Asian tiger mosquito and yellow fever mosquito.
  9. Tarps – these always sag, collect water and organic debris, resulting in a ‘Mosquito Motel’!

The presence of mosquitoes on a property means a majority of species are breeding nearby. As a result, your mosquito control inspections are important. Keeping both the usual & unusual breeding sites in mind when on a property will give you a leg up with your customer!

Captain Stan Cope (aka the Mosquito Man) is our Vice President of Technical Services, learn more about him here: https://catchmasterpro.com/blog/stan-cope-phd/

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Get more content like this daily when you follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/catchmasterPRO/

Get our Mosquito Management Guide here: https://catchmasterpro.com/mosquito-management-program/

For help with mosquito season 2020 & beyond, discover Catchmaster® mosquito management tools:  https://catchmasterpro.com/collection/mosquito-management-tools/

In addition, learn more about mosquitoes from the NPMA here: https://www.pestworld.org/pest-guide/mosquitoes/

Finally, get tips for your business by following us on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/ap&g-co-inc

Ovi-Catch Mosquito Trap Ingredients

By | Mosquitoes, Tips & Inspirations, Trapping Tips | No Comments

The ingredients in our Ovi-Catch Mosquito Trap optimize performance. The trap, built for research conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), utilizes mosquitoes’ breeding habits against them. In particular, the trap mimics traditional breeding sites to draw the mosquitoes into the container and trap them on a glue board. Removing 1 female mosquito can eliminate up to 1,000 future mosquitoes field results indicate that capturing up to 30% of egg-laying female mosquitoes can decrease populations by 80%. Clearly, the trap can be a great addition to any mosquito management programs.

Therefore, placing the trap correctly and using the right ingredients as an attractant will go a long way to determining success.  First, some basics on trap placement. Traps should be placed in areas on a property that are conducive to mosquitoes.

Areas on a property to place Ovi-Catch mosquito trap

  1. Cool
  2. Shaded
  3. Moist
  4. Out-of-the-Wind

Above all, the key for ingredients is pretty simple, the smellier the better. Additionally, if possible prepare your mixture of the ingredient plus water a few days in advance. This will allow the mixture to get smellier and will produce more immediate results.

7 optimal Ovi-Catch Mosquito Trap ingredients

Ovi-Catch Mosquito Trap Ingredients - Icon

  1. Alfalfa hay
  2. Rabbit food pellets
  3. Stagnant water (from ponds, lakes, irrigation ditches, streams or rivers)
  4. Oak leaves
  5. Dry dog food
  6. Brewer’s yeast
  7. Grass clippings

Additionally. be sure to monitor your traps for performance over time. If one ingredient isn’t working don’t be afraid to switch it up & happy hunting!

Finally, did we miss your go-to ingredient? Let us know in the comments below, happy to update the article and add your tip!

Additional Resources

Get our free mosquito management program guide when you sign up for our e-mail list here: https://catchmasterpro.com/mosquito-management-program/

Get more content like this daily when you follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/catchmasterPRO/

Along with Ovi-Catch, discover our ful line of Catchmaster® mosquito management tools:  https://catchmasterpro.com/collection/mosquito-management-tools/

Additionally, Captain Stan Cope (aka the Mosquito Man) is our Vice President of Technical Services and blogs frequently on mosquitoes. In addition to his social media content you can find his blog archives here: https://catchmasterpro.com/?s=captain+stan

Finally, learn more about mosquitoes from the NPMA here: https://www.pestworld.org/pest-guide/mosquitoes/

Integrated Pest Management Tips for Re-Opening

By | Insects, Mosquitoes, Pest Business, Rodents, Tips & Inspirations | No Comments

Integrated Pest Management Tips for Re-Opened Accounts

Learn how to be at the top of your game with these top 5 integrated pest management tips for re-opening. With people heading back to work and accounts opening their doors the opportunity for pest professionals has increased. Without regular maintenance there is a chance the pest pressure at previously closed businesses may be at an all-time high. Think about a re-opened account as a lake that has not been fished in awhile or a well-beaten deer path in the woods. Opportunity abounds, but where to start? Keep these 5 integrated pest management tips in mind when first visiting a re-opened account.

Top 5 IPM Tips for Re-Opening

Top 5 Integrated Pest Management Tips for Re-Opening - House

  • Exterior inspection – like any good pest detective your work in a re-opened account will start with the exterior. As a result, a thorough inspection is vital. If the business or property has been closed for an extended period of time it is likely that basic property maintenance has been neglected. Look for any piles of debris, like trash, leaves or lawn clippings that may have accumulated. They may provide food and harborage to pests. For mosquito prevention look for any standing water. Inspect the structure as well as cracks in foundations for gaps in doors may have grown. Exclusion work is likely to be required. Here is a helpful article with the top 5 areas for exclusion in a home: https://catchmasterpro.com/blog/top-5-areas-for-exclusion-around-the-home/
  • Don’t miss the forest for the trees – as a pest pro you are trained to look for minute details in an account but now the reverse might be true, and the bigger details may be more prominent. This may be especially relevant for rodent activity. With months of unimpeded activity, telltale signs of rodents are more likely to emerge. These signs include:
    • Droppings
    • Strong Odors
    • Gnaw Marks
    • Tracks or Rub Markings

Be mindful of conducive conditions

  • Drains and water systems – if an account has been closed for awhile chances are the water has been drained. Therefore, the presence of moisture around drains or other water systems may be an indication of an underlying condition, like a leaking pipe or clogging. Here’s a pro tip – to monitor for small flies found in many commercial accounts use one for our 100FF Fruit Fly Glue boards inverted above a drain. This will allow you to diagnose any flies that have found a food source during closure.
  • Sanitation opportunities – with fewer people at work there is a possibility that normal, everyday sanitation has been neglected. This could include examples like leftover trash to floor and surfaces that have not been mopped or swept for some time. Look for signs like mold or staining and provide sanitation recommendations. Not only will this educate your customer it may provide the opportunity for add-on surfaces.

Don’t forget your toolbox!

  • Use the right tools – install monitors, like our 100i & 288i Insect Monitors in areas where insects and rodents might be. A lot has likely changed since you were last in the facility and monitoring will allow you to establish a new baseline. Monitoring will not only tell you what species have flourished but they will also tell you where they are at. If pests have flourished, consider utilizing a tool like our Catch Zone Pest Boundary Roll. With 60 feet of catching power it is ideal for hotspots and clean outs.

In a lot of ways, visiting a re-opened account may feel like a regular maintenance check, just on steroids. Therefore, it may feel daunting but focus on the basics first. With pests flourishing in the absence of human activity the key is to look for the basic signs, both small and large, that will inform your integrated pest management program.

Integrated Pest Management in Re-Opened Accounts – Additional Resources

Get more content like this daily when you follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/catchmasterPRO/

Sign up for our mailing list here: https://catchmasterpro.com/join-email/

Learn more about mosquitoes from the National Pest Management Association here: https://www.pestworld.org/pest-guide/mosquitoes/

Finally, get COVID-19 updates from the NPMA here: https://www.pestcontrolcoronavirus.com/

Distribution of Mosquito Species

By | Mosquitoes | No Comments

The distribution of mosquito species can vary wildly by location.There are about 3,000 species of mosquitoes known in the world.  In the insect universe, this is a relatively small number compared to estimates of over 500,000 species of beetles! In North America, there are about 175 species of mosquitoes; some are quite common while others are rarely encountered.

Distribution of Mosquito Species in the US

In the United States, the number of species by state is quite variable, as shown in the map below.   Hawaii, as expected, has the fewest species with 8 while Texas and Florida lead the way with 85 and 80, respectively.  The differences are in part driven by the amount of biodiversity within each state.  The greater the biodiversity, the more types of habitats for mosquitoes are available.

Distribution of Mosquito Species - Map

So, mosquitoes are not randomly distributed across the United States nor within an individual state.  This principle also applies to the properties of your customers.  Adult mosquitoes are fragile creatures, subject to dessication (drying out) and death if exposed to harsh environmental conditions.  Therefore, they will be found primarily in areas that are widely known as Captain Stan’s ‘Big Four’.

Captain Stan’s “Big Four” Areas Where Mosquitoes are Located on a Property

  1. Cool
  2. Shaded
  3. Moist
  4. Out-of-the-Wind

If you target the Big Four for your treatments, not only will you kill the mosquitoes but you will save time, money, use less product, and better protect the environment.  Happy Hunting!

Distribution of Mosquito Species - Chart

Captain Stan Cope (aka the Mosquito Man) is our Vice President of Technical Services, learn more about him here: https://catchmasterpro.com/blog/stan-cope-phd/

Mosquito Distribution – Additional Resources

Get our free mosquito management program guide when you sign up for our e-mail list here: https://catchmasterpro.com/mosquito-management-program/

Get more content like this daily when you follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/catchmasterPRO/

For help with mosquito season 2020 & beyond, discover Catchmaster® mosquito management tools:  https://catchmasterpro.com/collection/mosquito-management-tools/

Finally, learn more about mosquitoes from the NPMA here: https://www.pestworld.org/pest-guide/mosquitoes/

The Untold Story of Sir Ronald Ross

By | Mosquitoes, Tips & Inspirations | No Comments

The Untold Story of Sir Ronald Ross by Stanton E Cope

It is highly likely that many of you have heard the name Ronald Ross, and perhaps you even know a bit about him. In the history section of almost any medical entomology class or textbook, we learn that Ross, a British physician of Scottish descent, is credited with the first successful demonstration of the transmission of malaria parasites (in birds), and that he was guided in his studies by Sir Patrick Manson, generally considered the Father of Tropical Medicine.

But who was this person? What did he really want to do with his life? And how did the confused son of a dominant father end up a Nobel Prize winner in a profession he avoided and loathed as a young man? Let’s find out. This article will not regurgitate all of the scientific and professional accomplishments of Ross, but instead, is intended to provide a snapshot of the unique and fascinating foundation upon which his career was built.

Ronald Ross was born in Almora, India, on the fringe of the Himalayan Mountains, on May 13, 1857. He was the eldest of 10 children of whom 9, remarkably, survived to adulthood. His father, Brigadier General Sir Campbell Clay Grant Ross, was stationed in India where the Ross Family had connections for over a century. Ross’s mother was Matilda Charlotte Elderton, of whom he wrote “like all mothers…ours was the best in the world.” Judging from his own account in his Memoirs written in 1923, Ross appears to have experienced the typical life of a British child in India.

EARLY EFFORTS AND FAILURES

In April of 1865, when he was nearly 8 years old, Ross was sent back to England for schooling. He lived with his father ’s sister and her husband, also an Army officer. For the next 9 years, Ross attended various schools, including a boarding school, where he was grounded in the classics, became proficient in mathematics, and studied drawing and music. He also indulged his interest in natural history, star ting a book “which should contain a description of every known species of animal.” He read the Bible and studied noted authors such as Pope, Milton and Shakespeare.

By age 17 (1874), Ross’s career goal s focused on being an artist or joining the Army or Navy. However, his father had other ideas for his eldest son. In Ross’s own words, “my father had set his heart upon my joining the medical profession and, finally, the Indian Medical Service, which was then well paid and possessed many good appointments….but I had no predilection at all for medicine and like most youths, felt disposed to look down upon it.”

Ross enrolled in medical school at St Bartholomew’s Hospital in London after being delivered to the front door by his father personally, but his academic efforts were diluted with writing drama and poetry, composing and playing music, and teaching himself to play the piano. In 1879, after 5 years of insincere effort, Ross failed to qualify in medicine. Then, he made a fateful decision. Threatened with losing his father’s financial support to continue his medical school efforts, Ross instead took a job as a Ship’s Surgeon, something that he had qualified for while in school.

During the next two years while crisscrossing the Atlantic, he was able to study for his medical exams while engaging with a cross-section of human it y bound for a better life in the United States. At one point, he performed an above-elbow amputation without any skilled help. Ross was so moved by this whole experience that he started writing a tale called ‘The Emigrants’ but he never finished it.

MARRIAGE AND EARLY STUDIES ON MALARIA

Ross finally joined the Indian Medical Service and served in India and Burma until 1888. By this time, pay in the Service was average or below and opportunities for promotion were scarce due to a plethora of junior officers. Also, the medical work was slow so Ross had plenty of time to devote to tennis, golf, writing dramas and studying mathematics and philosophy. This was not, however, Lieutenant Ross’s ‘cup of tea,’ and depression set in. In 1888 he returned to England on furlough. His life was about to change drastically.

Ross met and married Rosa Bessie Bloxam in 1889. After a brief honeymoon in Scotland, he really began to apply himself to his chosen profession and concentrated more and more on sanitation, as he had seen first-hand its importance in India. He received a Diploma of Public Health from a newly-established curriculum in London, the first member of the Indian Medical Service to do so. Also, he took a two-month course in the fledgling discipline called ‘bacteriology.’

Ross saw 1889 as a turning point in his life. Even though he was a romantic, he did not attribute it in any way to the presence of his new bride in his life. In fact, Ross rarely mentions her in his Memoirs. Instead, writing about the years immediately before he met Rosa, he states “ for six years, I had toiled outrageously at almost everything, sparing neither body nor mind; solitary toil which I never mentioned to my friends. Now [referring to his depression in 1888] had come the reaction…I could work no more – nor even play; my ponies browsed unsaddled, my books rested unread. Then, moreover, my faith died – the greatest of all faiths, the faith in labour; and I was overcome with the horror of the cui bono. What was the use of anything?” Cui bono is Latin for ‘ to whose benefit.’ The marriage produced 4 children; 2 boys and 2 girls. The eldest child, Campbell Ross, was killed in battle at age 19, shortly after the start of World War I.

With his new wife, new diploma and new training in tow, Ross returned to India with renewed enthusiasm, and he dove right in. He took with him several bacterial cultures and he began to study mosquitoes. One of Ross’s weaknesses, however, was his ignorance of the published literature. In 1880, a French Army physician named Alphonse Laveran first observed malaria parasites in human blood, and his discovery was widely known.

Strangely, Ross soon began to preach on two themes regarding malaria: (1) that the vast majority of supposed malarial fevers were really intestinal in origin (referred to by Ross as ‘intestinal auto-intoxication’); and (2) that Laveran’s so-called ‘parasites’ were really nothing more than blood cells misshapen by faulty techniques used to examine them! This was quite a brash statement from one who only recently became relatively proficient at microscopy.

The year 1894 arrived, and with it a year’s furlough to London for Ross, his wife, and two daughters. On April 10th, Ross met Sir Patrick Manson. It was the beginning of a relationship in science and friendship that both men needed and from which the world benefitted. Manson’s contributions to Ross’s efforts may be summarized as follows:

First, he convinced Ross of the correctness of Laveran’s observations, even showing him malaria parasites on several occasions. Second, he spoke with Ross many times about his theory that malaria parasites were somehow transmit ted by mosquitoes. Third, and most importantly, through an extensive and well-preserved series of letters between the men, which in their own right are a literary epic, he helped to sustain, guide and challenge Ross through more than three years of frustrations, discoveries and difficult conditions in India.

Manson harnessed Ross’s unique talents, curiosity and insatiable appetite for work to a significant purpose, and kept him focused on the ‘main thing.’ Also, he knew that others were close to revealing the secrets of malaria transmission, and he pushed Ross to succeed, and soon. The following quotation from one of Manson’s letters illustrates this nicely:

“I was terribly disappointed for I thought you had fallen sick, or that you had got a check, or that you had given up the quest. Above every thing, don’ t give it up. Look on it as a Holy Grail and yourself as Sir Galahad, for be assured you are on the right track. The malaria germ does not go into the mosquito for nothing, for fun or for the confusion of the pathologist. It has no notion of a practical joke. It is there for a purpose, and that purpose, depend upon it, is its own interests – germs are selfish brutes.”

THE GREAT DISCOVERY AND THE NOBEL PRIZE

After leaving Manson and returning to India, Ross began his quest with a handicap that would have easily overtaken a lesser man – ignorance of almost everything he needed to know! As previously mentioned, he had taken a short course in bacteriology. He was self-taught in microscopy and did not know the literature so he was unaware of a new staining procedure that would have likely saved him hundreds of hours. As serious as these deficiencies were, they were trivial compared to his total lack of knowledge concerning mosquitoes!

His task was simply stated – to study Plasmodium, not in humans, but in mosquitoes – but incredibly complicated, and he encountered almost every possible obstacle. His major contributions over the next three years may be summarized as follows:

First, he demonstrated that volunteers who drank water contaminated with infected mosquito adults and larvae failed to contract malaria. Second, on August 20, 1897 he observed developing human malaria parasites and their characteristic black pigment in the stomach wall of Anopheles mosquitoes, which he cal led “dapple-winged.” For years after, Ross referred to this date as ‘Mosquito Day.’ The third and most significant contribution made by Ross came about courtesy of the British Army, for about one month after Mosquito Day, he received orders to an area where there was no human malaria. Ross was incredibly disappointed and frustrated by this at first. Some months later, however, this ever-resourceful scientist was able to demonstrate the full avian malaria life cycle using sparrows and Culex mosquitoes.

Ross’s experimental career ended in 1899 when he retired from the Indian Medical Service, perhaps so that he would not have to be away from his daughters, who likely would have been sent back to England for schooling. I shall have more to say about this later.

Ross was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1901, but he did not win. He was nominated again in 1902, and it was suggested by some that he share the award with Laveran, but Laveran did not receive his Nobel Prize until 1907. Ross was one of 42 well-qualified candidates, a list that was pared to 3 finalists. They were Ross, Pavlov of ‘Pavlovian response’ fame, and Niels Finsen, who worked on phototherapy of tuberculosis. Ross won, and his monetary award amounted to 141,846 Swedish crowns, then equivalent to about 7,880 pounds sterling, which was a considerable sum in 1902. Ross received his Nobel Prize on December 10, 1902, in Stockholm from the King of Sweden, Oscar the 2nd.

ROSS vs GRASSI

I would like to briefly examine the rift (to put it mildly) that developed between Ross and the Italian investigators, particularly Giovanni Battista Grassi. The Italians began work on transmission of human malaria in the middle of July 1898. By this time, Ross’s proof was complete and partly published. The Italians were well aware of what he had done and they knew that two main tasks remained: (1) demonstrate that the parasite of human malaria had a cycle in the mosquito similar to what Ross had shown; and (2) identify the mosquito that transmits human malaria parasites.

Essentially, the Italians followed Ross’s exact line of investigation, but used Anopheles mosquitoes and human parasites. When their work was published, Ross was stung to anger as he felt he was not given adequate credit. And in my opinion, he was right. But once the quarrel escalated, the simple truths were cloaked and twisted by pas s ion and jealousy. Here is the essence of the turmoil: 1) Ross might have completed his proof with human malaria, but he did not – the Italians did. 2) Ross speculated that the “dapple-winged” mosquito probably was the culprit – the Italians proved it. 3) Ross was the first to demonstrate the entire life cycle of the malaria parasite. 4) Ross is not entitled to the whole credit for the whole proof because he did not finish it in humans.

To quote Gordon Harrison from his book ‘Mosquitoes, Malaria and Man,’ “…it makes no sense or justice to couple the names of Ross and Grassi together as co-discoverers – as is often done – without noting the very large difference between the explorer at the helm and those who rode his decks and helped make a landing.”

Space does not permit us to examine the last 30 years of Ross’s life, but here are some of the highlights. After retirement, he returned to England and became a lecturer at the new school for tropical medicine at Liverpool, where he championed tropical medicine education in Britain. He later held the Chair in Tropical Medicine. In 1911, he was knighted, and in 1912, he moved to London to take up a consulting practice.

Much of the rest of his life was concerned with public health programs against malaria. His efforts to improve public health in general were unending. He traveled extensively to undertake malaria prevention campaigns, and during World War I he was appointed consultant in malaria to the War Office. His abrasive personality of ten got in the way of progress, however. In 1926, the Ross Institute of Tropical Hygiene was opened. The aim was to promote research on tropical medicine and to stimulate control measures for malaria. Ross was its first director, and remained so until his death.

Sir Ronald Ross passed away on September 16, 1932, at the age of 75. The cause of death was listed as “ illness.” Imagine that! He outlived all 6 of his younger brothers and one of his 3 sisters. Lady Ross died from heart disease almost one year before her husband. Ronald did not attend her funeral, as he was likely distraught and definitely very feeble, having suffered a stroke. Sir Ronald and Lady Ross were inter red in Putney Vale cemetery in southwest London.

SUMMING UP

So how should the world remember Ronald Ross? How should we, in the mosquito control profession and field of public health, think of him? The answer, although complicated, is clear in my opinion. He was a dedicated, highly intelligent scientist who made great discoveries. He was a renaissance man, for sure, schooled in the arts and music. He was passionate, inquisitive, and romantic. He could be cantankerous and difficult with friends and others, without a doubt. Even his relationship with Manson cooled over the years, in par t due to Ross ’s feud with Grassi.

Rightly so, he fiercely defended his character and scientific achievements. Despite receiving many awards and honors during his life, he felt embittered that he did not receive monetary reward from his country for his malaria work and he petitioned the British government on this subject and on behalf of other scientists. He wrote three novels, numerous poems, dramas and other literary works. He was a mathematician, a musician, and he loved nature. He was an epidemiologist and sanitarian. Sir Ronald Ross found his professional niche later in life, and once comfortable there, he excelled in his work and sought affirmation of what he had accomplished. Likely, we would all do the same under similar circumstances. I would like to end with the poem that Sir Ronald drafted on Mosquito Day, and finalized a few days later, after realizing the importance of what he had just seen under the microscope:

This day relenting God Hath placed within my hand A wondrous thing; and God Be praised. At His command, Seeking His secret deeds With tears and toiling breath, I find thy cunning seeds, O million-murdering Death. I know this little thing A myriad men will save. O Death, where is thy sting, Thy victory, O Grave!

REFERENCES

Harrison, G. 1978. Mosquitoes, Malaria and Man: A History of the Hostilities Since 1880. EP Dutton, New York. 314 pp.

Ross, R. 1923. Memoirs: with a Full Account of the Great Malaria Problem and its Solution. John Murray, London. 547 pp.

All quotations are taken from this book except where noted.

Disclaimer: The views contained herein are solely those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the Department of the Navy.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

I thank Dr Graham White for providing much of the background literature and FB for encouragement in completion of the manuscript.

Mosquito Feeding – Different Hosts and Different Times

By | Mosquitoes, Tips & Inspirations | No Comments

Mosquito Feeding Schedule

Knowing the mosquito feeding schedule of the pests on a property can inform your IPM plan.  There are about 3,000 species of mosquitoes in the world, with about 175 in North America.  What do all these mosquitoes feed on, and when do they feed?  Let’s take a look.

Mosquito Feeding - Bite Graphic

6 Mosquito Feeding Fun Facts

  1. Most species never bite people. They prefer instead to feed on large mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians.  One type of mosquito feeds on earthworms and leeches!
  2. One species, the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti, takes >95% of its blood meals from humans. This is part of the reason why it is such an efficient vector of several viruses including dengue, yellow fever, chikungunya, Zika and Mayaro.
  3. Mosquitoes such as the Northern house mosquito Culex pipiens, will feed on birds and humans so they are dangerous vectors of some viruses such as West Nile virus, which is normally maintained in birds.
  4. Only female mosquitoes bite, as they require blood to produce eggs. However, both male and female mosquitoes require multiple sugar meals per day for energy.  They usually get these meals from plants.
  5. The majority of species bite during the early evening and at night. However, some of the most vicious biters and most efficient disease vectors, including the Asian tiger mosquito and the yellow fever mosquito, bite mostly during the daytime.
  6. PMPs should always ask their customers what time of the day they are being bitten. This information can drive appropriate control efforts and save time and money.

Captain Stan Cope (aka the Mosquito Man) is our Vice President of Technical Services, learn more about him here: https://catchmasterpro.com/blog/stan-cope-phd/

Additional Resources

Get more content like this daily when you follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/catchmasterPRO/

Sign up for our mailing list here: https://catchmasterpro.com/join-email/

For help with mosquito season 2020 & beyond, discover Catchmaster® mosquito management tools:  https://catchmasterpro.com/collection/mosquito-management-tools/

Finally, learn more about mosquitoes from the NPMA here: https://www.pestworld.org/pest-guide/mosquitoes/

Pest Maintenance – 6 Things You Can Do Right Now to Service Accounts

By | Mosquitoes, Pest Business, Rodents, Tips & Inspirations, Trapping Tips | No Comments

Even without access to customers’ homes there are steps to maintain pest maintenance.  Certainly nothing replaces getting access to a commercial or residential account.   However, pest maintenance helps you bridge the gap.  Undoubtedly, this shows your customers value once access returns.

6 Pest Maintenance Tips to Service Accounts

  • Provide glue boards to your customers along with instructions on where to place them.  Hot spots include kitchen sinks, attached garages or basements.  Not only does this help ward off unwanted invaders, you now have a blueprint for how to service once you have access.  Pro tip – if you have extra office time get started with private labeling.  Here is an article on some of the benefits of private labeling: https://catchmasterpro.com/blog/private-label-pest-products-your-marketing-secret-weapon/
  • Conduct a thorough exterior inspection.  Let your inspection dictate your schedule to systematically address identified issues either immediately or over time.  Even if your customers do not move forward right away it provides a road map for continued service when things eventually return to business as usual.  Perform proactive exclusion services.  Here is an article that identifies some external hot spots: https://catchmasterpro.com/blog/top-5-areas-for-exclusion-around-the-home/
  • Consider your exterior trapping options.  Use weatherproof snap traps like our 605 Easy Set Snap Traps in bait or trapping stations around the  perimeter of homes to head off pests.  Additionally, our 611 Dual Action Twin Catch is a great tool to install in sheds and attached garages.  The trap heads off both crawling insects & unwanted rodents.

Don’t Forget the Mosquitoes!

Pest Maintenance - Fun Facts

Undoubtedly, nothing replaces a thorough inspection as part of your IPM plan.  However, even without a thorough internal inspection there are plenty of steps you can take to keep lines of communication open with your customers.  Building up goodwill can go a long way once business returns to normal.

Pest Maintenance – Additional Resources

Get more content like this daily when you follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/catchmasterPRO/

Sign up for our mailing list here: https://catchmasterpro.com/join-email/

Learn more about mosquitoes from the National Pest Management Association here: https://www.pestworld.org/pest-guide/mosquitoes/

 

Top Target Markets for Your Mosquito Service

By | Mosquitoes, Pest Business, Tips & Inspirations | No Comments

If you are a pest control organization that would like to get in the game of mosquito management it can be tough to know where to start – that is why we compiled this list of top target markets for your mosquito service.  The key is to remember look beyond your usual current customer base.  There are some unique niches that are in need of mosquito control. Consider the following targets:

7 Top Target Markets for Your Mosquito Service

Residential Targets

  1. Residential, single family homes – upsell mosquito control to your current pest management contracts. A good target is a single-family home, with higher income and those with children or pets. Homes with a water feature like a small pond or lake nearby, pool or a hot tub. Be sure to also target those who use their outdoor spaces often.  In addition, consider customers that have a deck or patio.  They will be particularly vulnerable to mosquitoes.
  2. Communities with retention basins and ponds – apartment complexes, condo associations and homeowner associations often times have shared ponds or retention basins.  Communities with these features need mosquito control services. Contact the property manager or homeowner association to be considered for a proposal.
  3. Landscapers, pool companies and other outdoor service companies – consider targeting other service companies who do work on lawns and landscapes. Oftentimes they are asked to do mosquito work but will look to sub work out or recommend another local mosquito company. Consider targeting those types of companies and build a partnership.

Business Targets

  1. Businesses who offer outdoor venues – any business with an outdoor space for their clients to enjoy is in need of mosquito protection. Some businesses like local event halls and restaurants may want to protect their clients from the annoyance of mosquitoes.  In addition, schools, daycares, nursing homes and health-care facilities have medical reasons to protect their clients.
  2. Wedding and event planners – consider forming relationships with event planners. Attending wedding shows and networking with planners will help to keep your service top of mind when clients are considering mosquito control for their events.
  3. Municipal mosquito control – while mosquito control districts often do mosquito control work using licensed employees there may be times they will not be able to keep up with the need for treatment and may need support. Consider forming a relationship with the decision maker within the municipalities to be on-call for overflow work as needed.
  4. Tire retailers and auto shop – tires make for a perfect breeding spot for mosquitoes as they capture and hold rain and other water. These businesses are in need of your service.  In fact, they may even be mandated by law to control mosquitoes if nearby homes or businesses are experiencing a mosquito problem.

Top Target Markets for Your Mosquito Service - Fun Facts

As you can see the top target markets for your mosquito service can vary from your usual targets.  Remember to adapt your pitch to each market to make your offerings more personable and better address the needs of each target.

Bobby Kossowicz is a content creator for the Catchmaster® brand, learn more here: https://catchmasterpro.com/blog/bobby-kossowicz/

Additional Resources

Get more content like this daily when you follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/catchmasterPRO/

Sign up for our mailing list here: https://catchmasterpro.com/join-email/

Learn more about mosquitoes from the National Pest Management Association here: https://www.pestworld.org/pest-guide/mosquitoes/

Finally, discover more about the Catchmaster® brand’s mosquito management tools here: https://catchmasterpro.com/collection/mosquito-management-tools/

Get in the Game of Mosquito Control with a Dynamic Mosquito Reduction Program

By | Insects, Mosquitoes, Pest Business, Tips & Inspirations | No Comments

Mosquito Reduction Program - Mosquito

Mosquito Reduction Program – Get in the game of mosquito control

A mosquito reduction program can be a key service for your pest control business.  Driven in part by fears over Zika, West Nile and other vector-borne diseases, mosquito control services are in increasingly high demand.  In fact, the rise in demand has corresponded with an increased presence from pest control organizations focused solely on mosquito control.  Yet, despite the opportunity, mosquito control is one of the most under-utilized revenue streams for established pest management companies.

Why is that?

There are several possible reasons for the hesitancy to add mosquito services:

  • Inability to fully eliminate mosquitoes on a property
  • Difficulty managing customer expectations
  • Available products on the market are limited
  • Products on the market may produce unpredictable results
  • Frustration with previous mosquito service protocols

Whatever the reason for staying on the mosquito control sideline, now is the time to get in the game!  For example, in the latest year available, PCT Magazine reported 78% of PMPs expected their mosquito revenue to grow in 2018.  PMPs can take advantage of this opportunity with an integrated mosquito management program from the Catchmaster® brand.  Our products are effective, eco-friendly and safe to use around people, pets and animals.  Most importantly, our products are backed by peer-reviewed, published science.

Mosquito Reduction Program – What products can help?

The Catchmaster® brand’s new mosquito bait, Final Feed™, attracts and kills. It is the first mosquito bait on the market and is classified as a 25B exempt minimum risk pesticide by the EPA.  In fact, the dual-action formula is made up of natural sugars that attract mosquitoes to the bait.  Once ingested, the micro-encapsulated active ingredient (garlic oil, 0.4%) reduces mosquitoes’ appetite for blood and then kills them. In fact, it’s a key component in a true integrated mosquito management program.  In fact, Final Feed™ mosquito bait stops the breeding cycle and reduces mosquito populations by over 90% within 2-3 weeks.

Final Feed™ mosquito bait joins the Catchmaster® brand’s expanding mosquito line which currently includes the Ovi-Catch™ mosquito trap.  Used together, both products offer the ability to “kill & catch” on a single property in an eco-friendly manner.

About Ovi-Catch

The Ovi-Catch™ mosquito trap uses mosquitoes’ breeding habits against them.  Research has shown that some of the most invasive mosquito species seek out containers to lay their eggs.  The Catchmaster® R&D team utilized this knowledge along with technology that was developed and tested at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) laboratory in Puerto Rico, to develop an economical, environmentally-safe and effective tool that works to catch female mosquitoes during their breeding cycle.

The Catchmaster® Ovi-Catch™ uses only organic matter, a container and a glueboard to attract and capture mosquitoes. The tool uses no pesticides, making it safe for use in everyday environments.  This includes areas like backyards and businesses where children and pets may be present.  For each female mosquito caught, up to 1,000 future mosquitoes may be prevented.

Bobby Kossowicz is a content creator for the Catchmaster® brand, learn more here: https://catchmasterpro.com/blog/bobby-kossowicz/

Mosquito Reduction Program – Additional Resources

Get more content like this daily when you follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/catchmasterPRO/

Sign up for our mailing list here: https://catchmasterpro.com/join-email/

Learn more about mosquitoes from the National Pest Management Association here: https://www.pestworld.org/pest-guide/mosquitoes/

Finally, discover more about the Catchmaster® brand’s mosquito management tools here: https://catchmasterpro.com/collection/mosquito-management-tools/