Category

Mosquitoes

Intelligent Pest Management

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AP&G Co., Inc. = Intelligent Pest Management (IPM)

The pillars of our approach are grounded in a multi-step process to dealing with pests.

The 4 Steps of Intelligent Pest Management

  1. Inspection – spend as much time as it takes to do an excellent inspection to get a thorough understanding of the unique situations and problem areas that are present in your account.
  2. Plan – habitat manipulation to remove conducive conditions is critical – making sanitation and exclusion the cornerstones of any IPM plan.  Special consideration needs to be paid to sanitation and structural issues that are creating conducive conditions, attracting pests to your account and allowing them to thrive.  Your IPM Plan must take exact species identification and problem areas identified in your initial inspection consideration to identify the most prudent and effective means of removing the existing infestation.
  3. Execute – mitigate all conducive conditions, incorporate any sanitary or exclusion requirements where necessary and remove remaining pests from your account based on your comprehensive IPM plan.
  4. Monitor – install monitors or schedule repeat visits to evaluate the results of your plan and to identify new or recurring problems.

Working together, each of the steps in Intelligent Pest Management provide a holistic system for protecting your client’s “turf”.

Intelligent Pest Management - 4 Steps

Additional Resources

Learn more about our full line of IPM monitors and other products here: https://catchmasterpro.com/product-line/ 

Get more great content like this in your inbox – sign up for our mailing list here: https://catchmasterpro.com/join-email/

Learn more about your pest management professional options from the National Pest Management Association here: https://npmapestworld.org/

Stan Cope, PhD

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You may know our Captain Stan Cope (aka the Mostquito Man) from our online content.  Each month he publishes a new article covering everything mosquito.  But how did Stan become such a mosquito management expert?  Read on for some background on our Vice President of Technical Services.

Stan Cope – Educational Background

Stan was born and raised in Huntington, Indiana.   He was graduated in 1976 from Swarthmore (PA) College with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Biology.  In 1980, he completed a Masters in Entomology at the University of Delaware, with emphasis on medical entomology.  In 1988, Stan was awarded a PhD in Public Health from the University of California, Los Angeles, where he focused on medical entomology, tropical medicine and infectious diseases.

Military Career

In 1988, Stan was commissioned as a Lieutenant in the United States Navy, where he served as a Medical Entomologist for the next 23+ years, retiring with the rank of Captain (same as a full-bird Colonel).  He held a wide variety of assignments, conducting operational and research entomology in 18 countries.  The pinnacle of his career in the Navy was serving as Director, Armed Forces Pest Management Board and Director, Defense Pest Management in Washington, DC, where he had responsibility for all aspects of pest management for the United States Department of Defense.

Stan Cope - Fun Facts

He also directed a $5 million/year federal research program targeted at product development for arthropod control.  In this capacity, Stan fostered numerous global industry agreements, resulting in licensing, production and availability of several new tools including traps, attractants, baits and spray equipment.

Stan was awarded 24 ribbons and medals, including the Defense Superior Service Medal.  He retired from the Navy on September 1, 2012 and joined Terminix International two weeks later as Manager and then Director, Entomology and Regulatory Services.  Stan left Terminix in December of 2016 and joined Atlantic Paste and Glue (Catchmaster) in May of 2017.

Publications & Professional Stewardship

Dr. Cope has authored or co-authored over 80 scientific and technical publications.  A highly sought-after speaker, he has delivered over 150 presentations at scientific, technical and certification meetings and has given numerous lectures to community groups, school children and civic organizations.  He is a recognized expert on the history of medical entomology and yellow fever.

From 2008-2012, Stan served as a Regional Director for the American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) and was instrumental in launching AMCA’s Young Professionals group, designed to recruit a younger and more diverse membership interested in entomology, mosquito control and pest management.  He was elected Vice President of AMCA in 2014 and served as President in 2015-16, during the Zika crisis.  He also worked closely with Bayer to establish the Kelly Labell Travel Award, which funds a mosquito researcher, usually a student, to attend the AMCA annual meeting.  Kelly’s young life was tragically cut short by Eastern equine encephalomyelitis.

Stan Cope - Deadliest

Catchmaster & Leadership

Since joining the pest control industry, Stan has become the ‘go to’ person for all things mosquitoes.  Whether conducting site visits, providing field training or giving one of his highly popular lectures, he is always full of enthusiasm and passion for his subject.  He has been a crusader to encourage private industry to increase its commitment to Integrated Mosquito Management.  Additionally, Stan has developed a three-hour recertification class on mosquitoes, which he customizes depending on what audience and geographic region is targeted.  And check out his highly successful blog, ‘Captain Stan The Mosquito Man’ on the Catchmaster PRO website.

Stan has been very active in the National Pest Management Association.  Besides giving several presentations at NPMA events, he has served on the Technical Committee as a member and correspondent, served on the Commercial Committee, and served on the Pest Management Foundation’s research advisory group.    Also, he is a ‘Founding Father’, along with Marty Overline of Aardvark Pest Control, of NPMA’s PestVets Committee.

Finally, Stan is a regular contributor to Pest Control Technology (PCT) magazine and has written some pieces for Pest Management Professional (PMP).

Personal

In his ‘spare time’, Stan enjoys gardening, Civil War history, book collecting, sports, reading and family time.  Oh, and he also pitched three no-hitters in his baseball career; one in Little League, one in high school and one in college.

Stan Cope – Additional Resources

Get more great content like this in your inbox – sign up for our mailing list here: https://catchmasterpro.com/join-email/

For help with your upcoming mosquito season, discover Catchmaster® mosquito management tools:  https://catchmasterpro.com/collection/mosquito-management-tools/

Learn more about mosquitoes from the NPMA here: https://www.pestworld.org/pest-guide/mosquitoes/

Discover more efforts in mosquito management with the American Mosquito Control Association here: www.mosquito.org

Mosquito Management 2019 Review

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Oh! What a Year it has been in Mosquito Management!  What did we Learn?

2019 was a very unusual year for mosquito management and mosquito-transmitted in the United States.  The Centers For Disease Control and Prevention reported the information below as of the first week of December.

2019 Disease prevalence

For the past two years, there have been no locally transmitted cases of Zika virus reported in the US.  The yearly average since 1999 has been about 2,500 cases.  Conversely, we had a frightening year with Eastern equine encephalitis.  Normally, the US averages about 7 cases per year but in 2019, there were 37 cases and 15 deaths.  Cases occurred in 9 states, with Massachusetts leading the way with 12.

Also, there were 14 locally acquired cases of dengue; 12 of these in Florida, 1 in North Carolina, and 1 questionable case in the District of Columbia.  The local cases in Florida are not surprising, as a whopping 32% (321) of the travel-related cases occurred there!

Mosquito Management - Fun Facts

So, what can we learn from this – 3 lessons learned from mosquito Season 2019

  1. The threat from mosquito-transmitted diseases in the United States is very real.
  2. The threat varies each year geographically as well as by disease and by type of mosquito.
  3. Diseases that have not occurred in an area for several years can suddenly reappear, bringing significant morbidity and mortality.

Remain vigilant, especially if you are traveling to warmer climates (either within or outside the United States) over the holiday season and beyond.

Captain Stan Cope (aka the Mosquito Man) is our Vice President of Technical Services.  Learn more about Stan here:  https://catchmaster.com/introducing-captain-stan-the-mosquito-man/

Mosquito Management – Additional Resources

Get more great content like this in your inbox – sign up for our mailing list here: https://catchmasterpro.com/join-email/

For help with mosquito season 2020 & beyond, discover Catchmaster® mosquito management tools:  https://catchmasterpro.com/product/final-feed-mosquito-bait/

Finally, learn more about mosquitoes from the NPMA here: https://www.pestworld.org/pest-guide/mosquitoes/

Summary of Integrated Mosquito Management in Southern California Schools

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Integrated Mosquito Management – Background

Invasive mosquitoes, especially the Yellow Fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti and the Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus, are spreading rapidly in the United States and California is no exception.  These species prefer to breed in artificial containers such as tires, cans and bottles, children’s toys, plant drainage saucers, clogged gutters – basically, anything that will hold water.  Also, they bite primarily during the daytime so school children are at increased risk.  Not only are they a biting nuisance, but they can also spread serious diseases such as dengue fever, chikungunya, Zika virus and yellow fever.

Integrated Mosquito Management - Fun Facts

Successful Control in Schools Using Integrated Pest Management

In Southern California, school districts deal with large numbers of complaints about mosquitoes.  These complaints come from students, teachers, staff and parents.  With current restrictions on treatments in sensitive areas like schools, hospitals, child-care, etc. the integrated pest management teams were frustrated because they had almost no tools to address these mosquito issues.  The IPM staff were limited to inspecting to remove breeding sites and treating with contact insecticides made from essential oils.

Our installation of Ovi-Catch at the Anaheim Union School District and the Los Angeles Unified School District provided excellent results.  The IPM Technicians were delighted to have “some options” to actually impact the mosquito population and satisfy the concerns of staff, students and parents.  The Ovi-Catch traps were installed in discreet and/or locked areas and had no issues with tampering.  The staff noted less mosquito activity and were very happy with the reduction of mosquito issues.

This success was enhanced with the introduction of Final Feed mosquito spray.  Final Feed improved results and offered a treatment method that lasted for 30 days or more.  One of the major issues in schools is the surrounding properties.  IPM Technicians frequently expressed that they had thoroughly inspected the school properties and removed breeding sources.  However, they have no control over the surrounding properties and standing water located there.  Final Feed provides a method of mitigating mosquitoes moving onto school property from adjacent areas.

The Final Feed applications and Ovi-Catch installations provided vital “leave behind” products that help to mitigate mosquitos that are originating off the property and are making their way onto the campus. “Ovi-Catch and Final Feed are an important part of our mosquito management program.  If you can use these valuable tools, you should” said Rich Kravetz, IPM Technician, Anaheim Union School District.

In general, we are having excellent results.  However, as is the case with most devices and materials, training is key. Results have been strongly supported by the management and staff in the IPM programs who are motivated and very willing to accept training on the proper application of Final Feed and placement of Ovi-Catch.

Information compiled by:

Stanton E. Cope, PhD, VP, Technical Products and Services, AP&G

Past President, American Mosquito Control Association

scope@catchmaster.com  Tel: (551) 689-8073

Jim Shaver, Western Regional Manager, AP&G

jshaver@catchmasterpro.com  Tel: (480) 760-5874

Additional Resources

For help with your upcoming mosquito season, discover Catchmaster® mosquito management tools:  https://catchmasterpro.com/collection/mosquito-management-tools/

Learn more about mosquitoes from the NPMA here: https://www.pestworld.org/pest-guide/mosquitoes/

Discover more efforts in mosquito management with the American Mosquito Control Association here: www.mosquito.org

 

CDC Mosquito Control Statistics

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In this update from Captain Stan (aka the Mosquito Man) learn more about some eye-opening CDC mosquito control statistics.

Diseases On The Doorstep:  An Eye-Catching Report From CDC

In May of 2018, our federal Centers For Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued a report I like to call ‘3X-9-8/10’.  That is NOT a code from a James Bond movie.  What is it then?

3 Startling CDC Mosquito Control Statistics from Vital Signs:

  1. 3X – From 2004-2016, there were an estimated 640,000 cases of disease in humans transmitted by mosquito, tick and flea bites.  This represents a 3X increase!
  2. 9 – Since 2004, 9 new “germs” spread by mosquitoes and ticks have been discovered in or introduced into the United States. An example of the former is Heartland virus; the latter, Zika virus.
  3. 8/10 – About 84% of local vector control agencies in the United States are lacking in at least 1/5 core competencies, and many are lacking in more than 1.

CDC Mosquito Control Statistics - Fun Facts

CDC Mosquito Control Statistics – Central Message

The central message here?  Diseases spread by biting arthropods are clearly on the increase, while our organized ability to detect and control them is sadly lacking.  This points toward a public health calamity.

Captain Stan Cope (aka the Mosquito Man) is our Vice President of Technical Services.  Learn more about Stan here:  https://catchmaster.com/introducing-captain-stan-the-mosquito-man/

Additional Resources

For help with mosquito season 2019 & beyond, discover Catchmaster® mosquito management tools:  https://catchmasterpro.com/product/final-feed-mosquito-bait/

Click here for the CDC May 2018 Vital Signs referenced above: https://www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/vector-borne/index.html

Finally, learn more about mosquitoes from the NPMA here: https://www.pestworld.org/pest-guide/mosquitoes/

Halloween Mosquito Prevention

By | Insects, Mosquitoes, Trapping Tips | No Comments

Don’t let mosquitoes take a bit out of your fun this year – use these 4 Halloween mosquito prevention tips to enjoy pest-free trick-or-treating!

Ah- Halloween!  The season of gremlins and ghouls is upon us, and costumes and candy rule the day!  However, if your locality has not experienced a heavy freeze, nasty mosquitoes will still be out on Halloween. Here are a few tips from Vampire Captain Stan to minimize your exposure whether you are dispensing candy or seeking it yourself.

Halloween Mosquito Prevention - Mosquito Fun Facts

4 Easy Halloween Mosquito Prevention Tips

  1. If costumes permit, cover as much of your exposed skin as possible. Limit access for the blood-seekers (mosquitoes, not vampires!)
  2. If needed, use a mosquito repellent that has an EPA-registered active ingredient (https://www.cdc.gov/zika/prevention/prevent-mosquito-bites.html)
  3. Mosquitoes love entering houses through open doors. When answering the doorbell, don’t leave the door wide open while giving treats.  Invite the visitors in or go outside with them.  If weather permits, you can set up your candy store outside or in the garage but be sure and protect yourself!
  4. Many kinds of mosquitoes are highly attracted to white light. Consider using yellow ‘bug lights’ or perhaps even super cool Halloween bulbs in your outdoor fixtures.  This will help limit the mosquitoes attracted to your front door as well as to your property.

Happy Haunting and remember:  Safety First!

Captain Stan Cope (aka the Mosquito Man) is our Vice President of Technical Services.  Learn more about Stan here:  https://catchmaster.com/introducing-captain-stan-the-mosquito-man/

Additional Resources

For help with mosquito season 2019 & beyond, discover Catchmaster® mosquito management tools:  https://catchmasterpro.com/product/final-feed-mosquito-bait/

Finally, learn more about mosquitoes from the NPMA here: https://www.pestworld.org/pest-guide/mosquitoes/

Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE)

By | Insects, Mosquitoes, Tips & Inspirations | No Comments

Eastern Equine Encephalitis – History

Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE), also known as sleeping sickness, was first recognized in 1831 when 75 horses died in Massachusetts.  The EEE virus was first isolated from horse brain in 1933.  Human cases were recognized in 1938 when 30 children died in the Northeast US.

Geography

Most cases occur in the Eastern US or Gulf Coast states as well as the upper Midwest.  Many cases are associated with hardwood swamps.  The virus is maintained in a mosquito-bird-mosquito cycle.  In the summer and early fall it is transmitted to humans by mosquitoes .  These mosquitoes are referred to as ‘bridge vectors’, as they ‘bridge’ the virus from birds to humans.  The virus cannot be transmitted human to human.

Eastern Equine Encephalitis - Mosquito Fun Facts

Eastern Equine Encephalitis – Impact on Public Health

About 30% of those who get Eastern Equine Encephalitis die, and those who survive have significant neurological impairment.  Those over the age of 50 and under 15 are at increased risk of severe disease, and infection provides life-long immunity.  There is no vaccine for humans.

Clinical illness presents in two forms:

  • A systemic illness, with symptoms much like influenza, that lasts 1-2 weeks with complete recovery
  • An encephalitic (inflammation of the brain) illness with restlessness, anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea, convulsions and coma.

2019 Update

The average number of cases per year is about 7.  However, in 2019 there have already been at least 27 cases in 6 states with 11 deaths (as of October 3rd).  Cases so far by state with deaths in parentheses include Massachusetts – 11 (4), Michigan – 8 (3), Connecticut – 4 (3), Rhode Island – 1 (1), New Jersey – 1, North Carolina – 1.

Captain Stan Cope (aka the Mosquito Man) is our Vice President of Technical Services.  Learn more about Stan here:  https://catchmaster.com/introducing-captain-stan-the-mosquito-man/

Additional Resources

For help with mosquito season 2019 & beyond, discover Catchmaster® mosquito management tools:  https://catchmasterpro.com/product/final-feed-mosquito-bait/

Finally, learn more about mosquitoes from the NPMA here: https://www.pestworld.org/pest-guide/mosquitoes/

Catchmaster Pestimonial – Diox Pest Control

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In this Catchmaster Pestimonial we examine how our Ovi-Catch™ Mosquito Trap helped Mike Robertson from Diox Pest Control with sensitive accounts.

mosquitoes at dusk

Ovi-Catch Helped Save This Pest Professional’s Two Largest Accounts

Mike Robertson is owner and CEO of Diox Pest Control. Prior to owning his own firm, Mike spent 17 years in the pest management industry working different aspects of the business from pest management technician to quality assurance manager in California, Washington and Hawaii. Mike recently shared with us his current struggle with controlling mosquitoes in two large resort accounts with sensitive water areas that contained wildlife, prohibiting his ability to use chemicals for control.

“Mosquitoes are a great add-on service offering for pest professionals. They are typically not a part of a general pest control contract and therefore an important and profitable addition for a pest management firm. Two of my current accounts are high-end resorts. Although they were happy with our general pest control, we struggled to get a true reduction in mosquitoes. These clients are located very close to areas where mosquitoes are reported as being infected with Zika & West Nile Virus so it’s beyond being a nuisance, mosquito control here is also about public health protection.”

catchmaster pestimonial

Catchmater Pestimonial: Ovi-Catch Mosquito Trap

“When I learned about Ovi-Catch I liked the concept and and decided to give them a try. After having Ovi-Catch out for two months, the clients are extremely happy with the control we’ve gained over mosquitoes. In just two months, they’ve hardly noticed mosquitoes in otherwise problem areas. I immediately decided to put out more throughout the rest of the property.”

Mike was thrilled with the results, “I’ve caught too many mosquitoes to count.” He went on to explain that his finding is the closer to the proximity of the standing water that you place the unit the higher the number of mosquitoes you’ll see on the glue board. Mike also began placing the units near areas where high mosquito populations were typically reported, usually within 20 feet of a breeding source to get the most control.

ovi-catch mosquito trap

We asked Mike how the units fit into the resort surroundings and he shared: “Besides being very effective, I really like that the buckets blend into the landscape. It’s a different approach to mosquito control. I can see a lot of opportunity with Ovi-Catch in the future and I’m planning to expand this to new properties as an alternative means of mosquito control. Ovi-Catch saved two of my largest accounts, totaling $50-$60k per year. I’m very happy I found this product.”

Additional Resources

Learn more about Ovi-Catch™ Mosquito Trap here: https://catchmasterpro.com/product/ovi-catch-ago-mosquito-trap/

Bobby Kossowicz is a content creator for the Catchmaster® brand, learn more here: https://catchmasterpro.com/blog/bobby-kossowicz/

Mosquito Season 2019 – September Update

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In this mosquito season 2019 update, our Captain Stan (aka the Mosquito Man) shares some updates with fall approaching.  Although the season is changing, that doesn’t mean mosquitoes aren’t still a threat.

Is Mosquito Season Winding Down? Don’t be Fooled


The end of summer generally means cooler temperatures, and cooler temperatures mean fewer mosquitos, right?  Well, maybe.  There may be fewer mosquitoes but the disease threat, particularly in 2019, is still significant and all precautions to avoid mosquito bites should be practiced until the first hard freeze in your region.

Examples, you say?  Eastern equine encephalomyelitis, or EEE, has already killed four people in Massachusetts and it has been found in mosquitoes over a wide area of the state (also in some neighboring states).  There have also been several fatal cases in horses in Michigan.  West Nile virus has been very active throughout the country this year and in warmer areas, transmission to humans could continue into October or even November.  Finally, the yellow fever mosquito (Aedes aegypti, responsible for spreading Zika virus, chikungunya, yellow fever and dengue) continues to spread throughout California.

Mosquitoes bite; they want your blood,
And they care not that they aren’t loved;
They’re nature’s scourge, so stay awake;
Protect yourself – make no mistake.

(Ok, I know that I lack an impressive iambic pentameter……)

When not dabbling in poetry, our Captain Stan (aka the Mosquito Man) is our Vice President of Technical Services.  Learn more about Stan here:  https://catchmaster.com/introducing-captain-stan-the-mosquito-man/

Additional Resources

For help with mosquito season 2019 & beyond, discover Catchmaster® mosquito management tools:  https://catchmasterpro.com/product/final-feed-mosquito-bait/

Finally, learn more about mosquitoes from the NPMA here: https://www.pestworld.org/pest-guide/mosquitoes/

Final Feed FAQs

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What questions are customers asking about Final Feed™ Mosquito Bait?

Captain Stan (aka the Mosquito Man) has traveled the US and compiled some Final Feed FAQs from the field.  Check out his update below.

Part of my amazing job at AP&G (Catchmaster®) is to travel around the country, providing classroom and field training on mosquitoes and Catchmaster’s line of mosquito control products.  Various venues have included pest control companies, professional meetings, trade shows, specialized workshops for continuing education credits, zoos and even back rooms at restaurants!  Here are the top three questions that customers ask about Final Feed, the first-ever bait for mosquito control.

Q:  What is the science behind Final Feed?

A:  Both male and female mosquitoes require multiple sugar meals each day for energy and survival.  As a result, they acquire these sugar meals from plants.  Final Feed is a sugar-based bait that is sprayed on non-flowering vegetation, where the mosquitoes ingest it.

Q:  How does Final Feed work?

A:  The active ingredient is microencapsulated garlic, which is contained in a bait matrix.  The exact mode of action is unknown (a Ph.D. thesis in waiting) but after ingestion, the majority of mosquitoes die within 1-2 days.  Also, after ingesting the garlic, female mosquitoes lose their appetite for blood.

Q:  As Final Feed is a sugar-based product, doesn’t it attract other pest insects?

A:  No.  Rigorous scientific testing in the field clearly demonstrates that other insect pests are not attracted by the bait mixture.

We hope you enjoyed these Final Feed FAQs, reach out with your own and check out some additional links below.

Discover Final Feed Mosquito bait here: https://catchmasterpro.com/product/final-feed-mosquito-bait/

Learn more about Captain Stan (aka the Mosquito Man) here: https://catchmaster.com/introducing-captain-stan-the-mosquito-man/

Finally, learn more about mosquitoes from the NPMA here: https://www.pestworld.org/pest-guide/mosquitoes/